Archive for carrot

Grouse broth

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

It’s such a shame to scrape grouse bones into the bin when there is still so much flavour left – a couple of grouse carcasses will make plenty of soup for four people.

For the stock:

carcasses of 2 grouse, chopped into 4 or 5 pieces
1 small onion, peeled, halved and roughly chopped
1 medium carrot, peeled, roughly chopped
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
a couple of sprigs of thyme
4 juniper berries
1 tbsp vegetable oil
a good knob of butter
1 tbsp flour
1 tsp tomato purée
2l chicken stock
salt and freshly ground black pepper

To garnish:

2 sticks of celery, peeled if necessary and cut into rough 1cm squares
1 small leek, trimmed, cut into rough 1cm squares and washed
1 medium carrot, peeled and cut into rough 1cm squares
a couple of leaves of green cabbage, cut into rough 1cm squares

Heat the vegetable oil in a heavy-based saucepan and fry the grouse carcasses, onion, carrot, garlic and herbs on a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, stirring every so often until lightly coloured. Add the tomato purée and chicken stock, bring to the boil, season and simmer gently for an hour.

Strain the soup through a fine-meshed sieve into a clean saucepan, reserving the bits of carcass. Add the celery, leek and carrot and simmer for about 15 minutes or until they are tender, then add the cabbage and simmer for another 5-6 minutes. Meanwhile, remove as many bits of meat from the grouse carcass as possible and add to the soup and simmer for a few minutes, re-season if necessary and serve.

Poached chicken and lentil salad

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Half Hour Meals

2 poached chicken breasts, torn into pieces
12 breakfast radishes (the long, white-tipped ones), poached in water until just tender
6 young carrots, poached in water until tender
1 small bunch of tarragon, leaves only, finely chopped
100g cooked lentils
1 small head of radicchio

For the dressing:
1 egg yolk
1 tsp honey
3 tsp verjuice or dry white wine
2 tsp Dijon mustard
80ml olive oil
½ tbsp crème fraîche
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Place the egg yolk, honey, mustard and verjuice/wine into a mixing bowl and whisk together to combine. Continue whisking while you add the olive oil as slowly as possible. Finally stir in the crème fraîche and season with salt and pepper.

Arrange the vegetables, lentils, salad leaves and poached chicken on a plate and spoon over the vinaigrette. Serve at once.

Vegetable and herb casserole

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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Like meat-eaters, vegetarians like to be a bit spoilt sometimes too – but it’s often the case that restaurants don’t make much of an effort, preferring to treat them like they have some sort of social disorder or disease instead. I’d say that British chefs are getting much better at serving veggies than they used to, and in some restaurants these days you even get a separate vegetarian or vegan menu. By contrast, in some nameless countries not too far across the water, the old ways of treating vegetarian guests sadly still prevail.

1 large onion, peeled, halved and roughly chopped
1 clove of garlic, peeled and crushed
a couple of good knobs of butter
2 tsp flour
1l vegetable stock
2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into cm slices on the angle
4 medium young turnips, scrubbed
4-6 sticks of celery, peeled if necessary and cut into 1cm-thick slices on the angle
1 young leek, cut into rounds
4-5 leaves of green cabbage, cut into rough squares
2-3 tbsp chopped green herbs like tarragon, parsley, chervil, chives, fennel
2-3 tbsp double cream

Gently cook the onion and garlic in the butter for 2-3 minutes without colouring, add the flour then gradually stir in the vegetable stock, bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the carrots, turnips and celery and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the leak and cabbage and simmer for another 6-7 minutes, then add the herbs and double cream. Check seasoning and re-season if necessary.



Arts

Grouse and pearl barley broth

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 14, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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Half Hour Meals

The Glorious 12th has arrived, i.e. shooting grouse.

At this time of year, I hate to see the carcasses of game birds being scraped off the plates into the bin; you’d be surprised how much meat you can retrieve from a supposedly finished carcass, especially if your guests haven’t got their hands dirty and picked the birds.

carcasses from 4 grouse, chopped into 4 or 5 pieces
1 small onion, peeled, halved and roughly chopped
1 medium carrot, peeled and roughly chopped
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
a couple of sprigs of thyme
4 juniper berries
1 tbsp vegetable oil
a good knob of butter
1 tbsp flour
1 tsp tomato purée
2 litres chicken stock
salt and freshly ground black pepper
50g pearl barley, soaked for a couple hours in cold water
1 small leek, trimmed, cut into rough 1cm squares and washed
60-80g seasonal wild mushrooms, cleaned and sliced or halved

Heat the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-based saucepan and fry the grouse carcasses, onion, carrot and garlic on a high heat for 3-4 minutes, stirring every so often until lightly coloured. Add the thyme, juniper, butter and flour and stir well for a minute or so; then add the tomato purée. Slowly stir in the chicken stock, bring to the boil, season and simmer gently for an hour.

Related:

Roast grouse with creamed lentils

Sashimi salad

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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I’ve eaten salads such as this at London’s Nobu restaurant and it’s essential to use really fresh fish. Ponzu is a kind of ready-made citrus dressing that can be bought from Japanese supermarkets as well as good delis and supermarkets.

150-200g very fresh white fish such as bass, bream, halibut
a small handful of small tasty salad leaves and herbs such as coriander, mizuna, celery, silver sorrel, rocket
1 medium carrot, peeled and shredded into matchstick-sized pieces
6-8 mangetout, trimmed and shredded
4-5cm piece of mooli, peeled and shredded into matchstick-sized pieces
4 spring onions, finely shredded on the angle
50-60g inoki mushrooms, trimmed
10g black fungus, soaked in cold water for a couple of hours
120-150ml Ponzu

Drain the black fungus and shred as finely as possible; place in a bowl with the inoki mushrooms and Ponzu and leave for about 30 minutes.

Slice the fish with a sharp knife as thinly as possible and lay out on a tray. Toss the mushrooms with the salad leaves, shredded vegetables and spring onions, reserving a couple of spoonfuls of the liquid and season.

Spoon the reserved Ponzu over the fish. Arrange the salad on plates with the slices of fish and spoon over any excess Ponzu.

St George’s Day: Roast rib of beef

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 23, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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2 x 800g fore rib of beef cutlets
1 small picked sprig of thyme
1 small picked sprig of rosemary
75g beef dripping
½ tsp Colman’s English mustard powder
½ tsp Maldon sea salt
½ tsp freshly milled or ground white peppercorns
2 tsp cornflour
1 bunch of English watercress

For the gravy:
150g of finely diced onions
150g finely diced carrots
150g finely diced leeks
500ml homemade beef stock or boeuf bouillon stock cube
300ml good red wine

Preheat the oven to 240°C. Calculate the beef’s cooking time at 7-10 minutes per 800g for rare, 13-16 minutes for medium and 20-25 minutes for well done. Allow 15-20 minutes for resting.

Mix the milled pepper, mustard powder and sea salt, rub over all sides of the beef.

Put the dripping in a metal frying pan (no plastic handles) on full heat until it slightly smokes.

Place the beef cutlets in the pan and brown quickly on all sides, sprinkle the herbs and garlic over the beef and place frying pan on the middle shelf in the oven.

Lower the oven temperature to 190°C after the beef has sizzled for 8 minutes and cook as required.

Remove the beef from the oven and increase the oven temperature to 220°C for the Yorkshire pudding. Drain the cutlets on a cooling rack, covered with foil with a tray underneath to collect the juices and allow to rest.

Make the gravy by draining most of the dripping from the frying pan (reserving it for your roast potatoes). Place the diced vegetables in the pan and brown on top of the stove for five minutes until slightly caramelized. Stir in the cornflour and mix well with the vegetables, gradually adding the wine and stirring well until the mixture thickens. Bring to the boil and reduce by half before adding the stock. Stir well and simmer the gravy for 15 minutes. Pass through a sieve to remove the vegetables and keep warm until needed.

Tip juices from the beef into the gravy. Place the beef on a chopping board and carve across the grain, placing the slices on a warm platter. Drizzle around some of the gravy, garnish with watercress and serve with Yorkshire pudding and roast potatoes.

Osso bucco gremolata

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 20, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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The bone marrow in the central core of osso bucco is what gives this dish its rich flavour and glossy appearance. Through slow cooking the meat becomes meltingly tender and the marrow so soft and sweet that it can be dug out using no more than a spoon. The final sprinkling of the gremolata adds a freshness and zest to the end dish that is necessary to counteract its rich flavour.

6 pieces of osso bucco, ask the butcher for ones of equal size
sea salt and black pepper
40ml olive oil
3 celery sticks, trimmed and chopped
6 carrots, peeled and chopped into generous sized chunks
2 onions, peeled and finely sliced
4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
1 bunch of marjoram
1 bunch of flat leaf parsley
4 fresh bay leaves
1 tin of good quality tomatoes
750ml dry white wine
salt and pepper

For the gremolata:
1 bunch of flat leaf parsley, leaves only
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
zest of 2 unwaxed lemons

Season the meat well all over, and pour the olive oil into a heavy based saucepan. Place over a medium heat and, when the oil is hot, brown the meat well all over. Remove from the pan and set aside.

Pour off any fat remaining in the pan and return it to the stove. Turn the heat down and add all the vegetables, along with the garlic and herbs. Cook gently for 15 minutes or until the vegetables have begun to soften. Now add the tomatoes, turning up the heat slightly as you do so, followed by the white wine. Cook for a further 10 minutes, then return the meat to the pan. Place a lid on the pan, set the heat to fairly low and cook for an hour and a half. By now the meat will be soft and tender, and the sauce rich and glossy. Taste and adjust the seasoning, it will need more salt and a good grinding of black pepper.

Traditionally, osso bucco is served with risotto Milanese, dense arborio rice generously laced with saffron, but the combination of thick sauce and buttery rice can be too rich for some tastes, so I sometimes serve it with potato gnocchi or even just a leafy green vegetable such as cavolo nero or spinach. I’ve done it here with gremolata.

For the gremolata, place all the ingredients into a bowl and toss together lightly with your fingertips. To serve, spoon the meat and sauce on to a warmed serving plate and scatter over the gremolata.

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