Archive for eggs

Angela Hartnett: Watercress and goat’s cheese tart

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by Robin Gosnall

(Source: Grauniad)

Celebrate the fact that spring has sprung with some fresh watercress, which is just coming into season. If goat’s cheese is not your thing, a good cheddar or blue will work just as well. The most important thing to get right with a tart is the pastry – too often it’s soggy and the ruin of any good filling.

300g ready-rolled shortcrust pastry
2 bunches watercress minus the large stalks, torn roughly
125g goat’s cheese, rind removed
3 free-range eggs
200ml double cream
salt and pepper

You will need a tart ring of around 8in in diameter – use one with a loose bottom, or put it on a baking tray.

Roll the pastry out to overlap the edges of the tin. Blind bake the pastry – prick the base with a fork, add some baking beans (or dried pulses or rice) to preserve the shape. Bake for 15 minutes at 180ºC.

Remove the baking beans and cook the pastry for a further five minutes, until golden brown, then allow to cool.

Beat the eggs and cream together and season.

Steam the watercress to wilt it, dice the cheese roughly, then scatter both around the tart base and pour over enough of the egg mix to cover (we’re binding the filling, not aiming for an eggy tart).

Bake in the oven at 180ºC for 15-20 minutes until set. Allow to cool, trim the excess pastry and serve with a green salad.

• Angela Hartnett is chef patron at Murano restaurant and consults at the Whitechapel Gallery and Dining Room, London.

Angela Hartnett’s midweek suppers

Search terms for 7 days ending 2011-07-18

Posted in Blog Stats, Culture, Food, Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 18, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

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Toad in the hole with apple and rosemary

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 red skinned apples, washed and cored
8 pork and leek sausages
a few springs of fresh rosemary
100g plain flour
pinch of salt
2 large eggs
150ml half-fat milk
150ml water

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Place the oil in a large roasting tin and place in the oven to heat up.

Cut each apple into about 8 wedges.

Remove the hot roasting tin from the oven and add the sausages, apple wedges and rosemary and roast for 10 mins or until beginning to brown.
Whilst the sausages cook, place the flour in a bowl with the salt. Make a well in the centre and break in the eggs. Gradually whisk in the milk and water until the mixture is smooth. Set aside.

Remove the roasting tin from the oven and shake well, pour over the batter then return to the oven and bake for 30-35 mins or until golden and risen. Serve with vegetables and gravy.

Bacon toad in the hole

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 14, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

2 large eggs
125g plain flour
250ml semi-skimmed milk
good pinch of sea salt
2 tbsp sunflower oil
8 thick, good quality pork sausages
8 rashers rindless smoked back bacon
1 medium onion, finely sliced
2 garlic cloves, finely sliced
220g cherry tomatoes
300g green beans, trimmed

Preheat the oven to 220°C. To make the batter, put the eggs, flour, milk and salt into a food processor and blitz until smooth. Set aside.

Heat 1 tsp of oil in a large pan and cook the sausages for 5 minutes over a medium-high heat until browned all over, but not cooked through. Transfer to a plate and let cool. Wipe out the cooled pan with kitchen paper.

On a board, use the back of a knife to stretch out the bacon rashers and then wrap one around each sausage. Put the sausages into an ovenproof dish, drizzle over 2 tsp of oil and bake for 5 minutes. Remove the dish from oven and pour the batter around the sausages. Bake for a further 25-30 minutes, until the batter is well risen and golden.

Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1 tbsp of oil in the pan and cook the tomatoes until soft. Place in a jug and blitz using a stick blender. Gently fry the onion and garlic until softened and lightly browned. Pour the blitzed tomatoes into the pan with the onion and garlic, stirring well.

Ten minutes before the end of the toad in the hole cooking time, bring a pan of water to the boil, add the beans and cook for 3-4 minutes or until tender. Drain, and tip into the pan with the tomato sauce. Season and let simmer for a few seconds, stirring.

Cut the toad in the hole into wedges and serve with the green beans in tomato sauce.

Tuna tortilla

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

Half Hour Meals

A can of tuna can often save the day when it’s transformed into a tasty snack or a brunch-type dish such as this. It’s pretty good value for money and it will go quite a long way when you add in a few cooked potatoes.

1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped
a couple of knobs of butter
8 medium eggs, beaten
a couple of medium-sized potatoes (250-300g), peeled, cooked and cut into rough 1cm dice
2 tbsp chopped parsley
1 x 200g can of tuna, drained
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat a non-stick frying pan and gently cook the onions in the butter for 3-4 minutes without colouring until soft.

Meanwhile, mix the eggs, potatoes, parsley and tuna and season to taste.

Add the egg mixture to the pan with the onions and stir over a medium heat until the mixture begins to set, then stop stirring and allow the tortilla to set on the bottom without colouring.

Remove from the heat and turn out the tortilla on to a plate. Serve hot or cold.

Salad niçoise

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 3, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Half Hour Meals

The anchovies have been blended into the dressing with the capers so they act like a seasoning for the whole salad.

8 new potatoes
200g french beans, trimmed (or sliced runner beans)
4 eggs
12 cherry tomatoes, halved
8 artichoke hearts, cooked and quartered
3 little gems, washed
2 tbsp small black olives
200g tuna chunks in oil, drained

For the dressing:

juice of 4 ripe tomatoes, squeezed and sieved
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tsp capers
1 garlic clove, crushed
4 anchovy fillets
small bunch of basil leaves
75ml extra virgin olive oil
salt and pepper

Blend the ingredients for the dressing in a food processor (you can use some of the oil from the anchovies or tuna). Season well.

Wash the new potatoes and cook them in salted water for 20 minutes. Drain, cool and cut into halves or quarters.

Cook the beans in salted water for 5 minutes until slightly squeaky. Drain and cool.

Boil the eggs for 5-6 minutes, cool quickly, peel and quarter. The yolks should be a little squidgy still.

Separate the leaves from the little gem and arrange in a serving dish, ripping up the larger leaves.

Toss the tuna chunks, cherry tomatoes, french beans, artichoke hearts and potatoes in the dressing. Transfer to the serving bowl and combine gently with the little gem.

Top with the quartered eggs and olives, and sprinkle with shredded basil.

Yotam Ottolenghi’s aubergine cheesecake

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 23, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Like all good cheesecakes, tucking into this is so effortless and soothing that it’s easy to forget yourself and just gobble up more and more. And, like a sweet cheesecake, it’s also a bit of a no-brainer that yields very impressive results. Cut it into elegant squares and serve as a starter with a lemony salad of bitter leaves and fresh herbs. A rustic alternative would be to bake it in a casserole and spoon out portions at the table. Za’atar is a Middle Eastern spice mix – buy it online, in specialist shops and in some supermarkets. Serves four.

90ml olive oil
2 small aubergines, cut into 2cm thick slices
salt and black pepper
150g feta
150g cream cheese
60ml double cream
3 eggs
150g baby plum tomatoes, cut in half lengthways
2 tbsp picked oregano leaves, torn
¾ tsp za’atar (optional)

Preheat the oven to 190°C. Line with foil the base and sides of a deep, 19cm square baking tin (or a round, 22cm diameter dish), then brush lightly with oil.

Lay the aubergine slices on a baking sheet lined with greaseproof paper and brush all over with four tablespoons of olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast in the hot oven for 40 minutes – the aubergines need to go soft and golden. When cooked, remove, set aside to cool, and lower the oven to 150°C.

Put the feta, cream cheese, cream, eggs and some pepper in a bowl and whisk until smooth and thick.

Arrange the aubergine neatly in the baking tin – the slices should fill up the tray as they lean against each other, almost standing on their sides. Fill the gaps with tomatoes and sprinkle over half the oregano.

Pour in just enough of the cheese mix to leave some aubergine and tomatoes exposed, sprinkle over the remaining oregano and bake for 30 minutes, or until the “custard” sets. Leave the cake to cool down to room temperature, then remove it from the tin and cut into four squares (or into wedges, if using a round dish). Before serving, gently brush all over with za’atar mixed with a teaspoon of olive oil, or just olive oil.

Yotam Ottolenghi is chef/patron of Ottolenghi.

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s posh cheese on toast

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Half Hour Meals

Madame Rarebit, Mrs Rarebit, Jessica Rarebit, whatever you call it, this take on the classic croque madame is a winner. Serves four.

70g unsalted butter
3 tbsp flour
500ml whole milk
200g caerphilly cheese, grated or crumbled into small pieces
¼ tsp salt
a few grinds of black pepper
a few gratings of nutmeg
4 thick slices good white bread
2 tbsp Dijon mustard
4 thick slices cooked ham
4 eggs
1 tbsp finely chopped parsley

Melt 50g of the butter in a saucepan over a medium heat, then stir in the flour and cook for three minutes. Whisk in the milk and bring to a simmer, stirring constantly, for five minutes until you have a thick béchamel.

Stir in the cheese, then add salt, pepper and nutmeg. Cook until the cheese is melted. Heat the grill and toast the bread. Spread the toast with mustard and top with the ham. Spoon over the cheese sauce and grill until golden and bubbling.

While that’s cooking, heat the rest of the butter in a frying pan and fry the eggs, sprinkling them with a bit of salt and pepper, until the whites are just set and the yolks are runny. Top each slice of bread with an egg, sprinkle with salt, black pepper and parsley, and serve immediately.

Rhubarb and blood-orange meringue

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , on July 3, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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This sexy pudding should get your juices flowing. If you don’t have time to make your own, try meringues from Ottolenghi, which are mottled with raspberry purée for great visual effect.

150-200g rhubarb
100g caster sugar
1 tsp cornflour or arrowroot
1 blood orange, segmented, juice reserved

For the meringue:
2 egg whites
70g caster sugar
1 tsp cornflour
1 tsp white wine vinegar

To serve:
2-3 tbsp crème fraîche

For the meringue, pre-heat the oven to 120°C. Clean the mixing bowl and whisk in boiling water, then dry with kitchen paper to remove any traces of grease, as this will affect the stiffness of the egg whites once whisked.

In a mixing machine with a whisk attachment or by hand (although this will take quite a while), whisk the egg whites until stiff. Add the caster sugar and continue whisking until the egg whites are really stiff and shiny. Add the cornflour and vinegar and whisk again for about 45 seconds. Spoon the mixture on to a clean baking tray, lined with silicone or greaseproof paper, into one round dome.

For a spiky meringue, create peaks round the edge with the spoon if you like.

Cook in the oven for 1-2 hours or until the meringue is crisp on the outside and soft in the very middle, but don’t allow the outside to colour – you want it white.

You may need to cook it a little longer, depending on your oven; remove and leave to cool.

Cut the rhubarb into 2cm lengths and place in a thick-bottomed pan with the sugar. Cook on a low heat with a lid on for about 5 minutes or until the sugar has dissolved and the rhubarb is just tender.

Carefully drain in a sieve over a bowl to catch the juices. Pour the juice into a saucepan and add any juice from the blood orange.

Bring to a simmering boil, then dilute the cornflour with a little water and stir enough into the syrup to slightly thicken it and simmer for a minute or so. Leave to cool a little, then mix the rhubarb and blood-orange segments and stir in the syrup.

To serve, cut the top off the meringue, crush it up a bit and fold into the crème fraiche. Spoon the crème fraîche into the meringue and spoon the rhubarb mixture over.

Bread and butter pudding

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2009 by Robin Gosnall

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1 tbsp apricot liqueur
a small handful of sultanas
150g caster sugar
4 eggs
2 tsp vanilla extract
300ml double cream
300ml whole milk
8 thin slices of white bread, crusts removed
60g unsalted butter, softened
pouring cream, to serve

Heat the oven to 180°C. Now warm the apricot liqueur slightly over a low heat in a small heavy-based pan. Place in a small bowl and pour over the sultanas. Leave this to steep while you prepare the other ingredients.

Make the custard by placing the sugar and eggs in a bowl, along with the vanilla extract and whisk together until pale and creamy. Add the cream and milk and stir to combine. Pass through a fine sieve into a jug.

Butter the bread on one side and layer the slices in a medium-sized, ovenproof dish with the macerated sultanas scattered in-between. Pour over the custard and leave to stand for 15 minutes.

Stand the dish in a large oven tray and pour in enough water to come halfway up the sides. Carefully place in the hot oven and bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow it to cool slightly. Serve with the pouring cream.

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