Archive for photographers

What’s at the back of your kitchen cupboards?

Posted in Culture, Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 31, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

(Source: Grauniad)

Photographer James Kendall was rooting through his wife’s 90-year-old grandmother’s larder when he discovered packaged foods dating back to the 1950s. Some canned items were covered in rust.

“She doesn’t really believe in sell-by dates,” explains Kendall. “She holds on to everything, and sees it all as eventually having a use. I think it comes from her living through the war, and being used to rationing.” Among the ageing items were dried onions, smoked cod liver, canned corn, a jar of tartare sauce, and a pack of KP nuts, complete with vintage logos.

Kendall was so excited by the hoard that he took it back to his studio to be photographed – and hopes to exhibit the resulting series at next year’s Brighton Photo Biennial.

“I still daren’t open them,” says Kendall. “They’ve been wrapped in cellophane over the summer, so they’ve had a bit of a baking. I’m not exactly sure what state they’re in now. Probably worse than ever.”

Lee Friedlander: America By Car

Posted in Culture with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 3, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

Lee Friedlander went looking for America by car – but unlike other photographers he chose to shoot it through his windscreen, producing a set of strange and powerful images of the varied US landscape.

Lee Friedlander’s exhibition America By Car & The New Cars 1964, is at Timothy Taylor Gallery until 1 October.

The frame of the car window provides a constant in the photographs of vastly different American landscapes. Here, we can also see a reflection of someone in the car, looking out

Reflections from the car’s mirrors add to the complex composition of some of the photographs.

Sometimes the lines, angles and reflections can be perplexing, in this case reflecting the chaos of the city.

Photographs: Lee Friedlander, courtesy Frankel Gallery, San Francisco

Laura Levine: Musicians in pictures

Posted in Culture, Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

Afrika Bambaataa, NYC, 1983 by Laura Levine

(Source: Observer)

A revealing archive of unseen photographs of music stars taken more than 20 years ago is to go on display in a New York gallery on Thursday. The images, which were all taken by Laura Levine while working for a succession of music magazines in Manhattan, show performers such as Chrissie Hynde and Michael Stipe in an unpretentious setting or a pose that often challenges their public image.

“It was definitely my intention to get away from the studio look,” Levine told the Observer this weekend. “I started out as more of a photojournalist anyway and I wanted to get past all the artifice. I wanted to show a side to the public that was really something that they weren’t aware of. To show them something you don’t normally see.”

The photographic show, titled Musicians, is being mounted by the Steven Kasher Gallery and came about almost by accident after Kasher worked with Levine on another show chronicling the same era. Levene’s show is being billed as an insider’s look at the artists at the forefront of rock, punk, indie rock, post-punk hip-hop, new wave and no wave – and it is already causing a stir in the Big Apple.

“We were setting up a punk and post-punk poster show and talking to Laura then,” said Christiona Owen of the gallery. “Steven has known Laura for many years and enjoyed her photography and so we invited her to do a second show with us. We didn’t realise how many vintage prints she had for show that hadn’t been seen in public before.”

The show will be the first solo gallery exhibition for Levine and will feature more than 35 vintage and modern prints, including the photographer’s vintage gelatin silver prints, many of which are one of a kind.

“There’s been a strong interest in seeing the photos so we think the show is going to be very popular,” said Owen.

Levine has not taken photographs since 1994 and has worked instead in painting, video and animation, but in the 1980s she showed frequently in downtown galleries after working as chief photographer and photo editor of underground newspaper New York Rocker. She also published in the Village Voice, Sounds and Rolling Stone.

“My photo sessions would be very relaxed,” said Levine. “Most of the subjects I didn’t know beforehand, although some became friends. The REM photo I took in Athens, Georgia, at a point where they were very good friends. It was one of many times I photographed them. By the time I did that picture in the diner I knew them really well. I flew down to see them and we spent two whole days just going around Athens and we stopped there for lunch. Then I thought this would be a great picture, so I got behind the counter and told them all to look up.”

Among the other images in the show is a striking early photograph of Madonna. “I took it before she was famous in 1982, I think she had her first single coming out, and she was really game,” said Levine. “I knew nothing about her at the time. She came over to my apartment in Chinatown and climbed up all the steps to the top. I think some of the other pictures from that shoot are well known, but not the one in show. She was a pleasure to work with and had a real sense of self even then. I set that picture up by asking her to scream.”

The show also includes an evocative picture of Tina Weymouth of Talking Heads and hip-hop artist and DJ Grandmaster Flash. Marking the birth of hip-hop as a popular genre, it was taken in New York in 1981 in front of a wall of graffiti. “I love that shot. It was for the cover of Andy Warhol’s magazine Interview. They look great with those boomboxes,” said Levine.

“I think the most important thing with anyone you photograph is to establish a real sense of trust.”

Gallery: Laura Levine Musicians

Search terms for 7 days ending 2011-05-09

Posted in Blog Stats, Culture, Food, Music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

More bizarre search terms that have been typed in by people probably not looking for this blog, but who ended up here anyway …

tracey emin topless
porridge
brunch salad
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nigella pesto
naked people facebook
beverley callard feet
black pudding sandwich
ottolenghi aubergine cheesecake
david bailey flowers
ingrit pitt hot
turkey twizzlers
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pictures of herring used in cooking
library mess
large groups of naked people
ingrid pitt’s fangs
student cauliflower cheese
marilyn monroe getting her hair done
cold porridge sliced

Down the Road: The Lowry, Salford Quays

Posted in Culture with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

Nadav Kander, Selected Portraits 1999-2011: The Lowry, Salford

The photographer Nadav Kander has said a portrait is “so much more than just a likeness”. This exhibition showcases his work with celebrities from Ian McKellen to Cheryl Cole, Tinie Tempah to Barack Obama.

I might stroll down there tonight …

The 2010 Brown Bread List

Posted in Books, Culture, Music, Obituaries with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 31, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Here is a list of some of the significant figures who departed in the last year.

Kate McGarrigle, singer and songwriter, born February 6, 1946; died January 18 2010

Jean Merilyn Simmons, actor, born 31 January 1929; died 22 January 2010

Lee Alexander McQueen, fashion designer, born 17 March 1969; died 11 ­February 2010

Michael Mackintosh Foot, politician, journalist and author, born 23 July 1913; died 3 March 2010

Malcolm Robert Andrew McLaren, impresario, born 22 January 1946; died 8 April 2010

Alan Sillitoe, author, born 4 March 1928; died 25 April 2010

Lynn Rachel Redgrave, actor, born 8 March 1943; died 2 May 2010

Lena Mary Calhoun Horne, singer and actor, born 30 June 1917; died 9 May 2010

Dennis Lee Hopper, actor, photographer and painter, born 17 May 1936; died 29 May 2010

Beryl Bainbridge, writer, born 21 November 1934; died 2 July 2010

Alexander Gordon Higgins, snooker player, born 18 March 1949; found dead 24 July 2010

Edwin George Morgan, poet, born 27 April 1920; died 19 August 2010

Tony Curtis (Bernard Schwartz), actor, born 3 June 1925; died 29 September 2010

Joan Sutherland, opera singer, born 7 November 1926; died 10 October 2010

Agostino “Dino” De Laurentiis, film producer, born 8 August 1919; died 11 November 2010

Ingrid Pitt (Ingoushka Petrov), actor, born 21 November 1937; died 23 November 2010

Leslie William Nielsen, actor, born 11 February 1926; died 28 November 2010

Boris Ivanovich Tishchenko, composer, pianist and teacher, born 23 March 1939; died 9 December 2010

Don Van Vliet (Captain Beefheart), musician and artist, born 15 January 1941; died 17 December 2010

Roberto Alfonso Farrell, singer and dancer, born 6 October 1949; died 30 December 2010

Rare Marilyn Monroe Pics

Posted in Culture with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 18, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Dressed down in a simple white shirt and with her hair plaited in pigtails, Marilyn Monroe looks a far cry from the iconic star synonymous with old Hollywood glamour. In the newly released image, the actress sports a sombre expression but appears relaxed as she is snapped on set of 1961 movie The Misfits – her last ever completed film.

Other shots also show a fresh-faced Marilyn caught off-guard wrapped in a towel, reading the script between takes and standing at her trailer door sipping coffee as she chats to co-star Montgomery Clift.

The images form part of a series of eight intimate portraits entitled Marilyn, taken by America photo-journalist Eve Arnold, that went on display in galleries nationwide on Saturday. Only 495 prints of the pictures will go on sale, with prices starting at £350.

Eve Arnold said: “She was going places but she hadn’t arrived. She liked my pictures and was canny enough to realise that they were a fresh approach for presenting her – a looser, more intimate look than the posed studio portraits she was used to in Hollywood. It became a bond between us … Marilyn was very important in my career. I think I was helpful in hers too.”

Proclaimed by Vanity Fair to be the top photographer in the world, Eve Arnold’s career spanned much of the 20th century.

It was in 1954, with her intelligent choice of subject matter and a unique fresh quality that Arnold was invited to join Magnum Photos, the prestigious international co-operative of photographers as their first woman member.

Eve Arnold was recently honoured with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Sony World Photography Awards this spring, just one day after her 98th birthday.

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