Archive for recipes

Angela Hartnett: Watercress and goat’s cheese tart

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by Robin Gosnall

(Source: Grauniad)

Celebrate the fact that spring has sprung with some fresh watercress, which is just coming into season. If goat’s cheese is not your thing, a good cheddar or blue will work just as well. The most important thing to get right with a tart is the pastry – too often it’s soggy and the ruin of any good filling.

300g ready-rolled shortcrust pastry
2 bunches watercress minus the large stalks, torn roughly
125g goat’s cheese, rind removed
3 free-range eggs
200ml double cream
salt and pepper

You will need a tart ring of around 8in in diameter – use one with a loose bottom, or put it on a baking tray.

Roll the pastry out to overlap the edges of the tin. Blind bake the pastry – prick the base with a fork, add some baking beans (or dried pulses or rice) to preserve the shape. Bake for 15 minutes at 180ºC.

Remove the baking beans and cook the pastry for a further five minutes, until golden brown, then allow to cool.

Beat the eggs and cream together and season.

Steam the watercress to wilt it, dice the cheese roughly, then scatter both around the tart base and pour over enough of the egg mix to cover (we’re binding the filling, not aiming for an eggy tart).

Bake in the oven at 180ºC for 15-20 minutes until set. Allow to cool, trim the excess pastry and serve with a green salad.

• Angela Hartnett is chef patron at Murano restaurant and consults at the Whitechapel Gallery and Dining Room, London.

Angela Hartnett’s midweek suppers

Asparagus and duck egg mayonnaise

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , on March 5, 2011 by Robin Gosnall

Half Hour Meals

Not long now before the asparagus season starts …

Plenty of free-range duck eggs around too in a couple of months, just go to your local park …

Egg mayonnaise is one of those simple and delicious retro classics that you very rarely see on restaurant menus these days. But simple though it may be, it’s far from boring, especially if you use a free-range duck egg and some good quality mayonnaise.

I’ve added some asparagus here to make the dish a bit more interesting, as well as seasonal.

4 free-range duck eggs
400-500g asparagus with the woody ends removed
6-8 tbsp good quality or home-made mayonnaise
a little cayenne pepper to serve

Cook the asparagus in boiling salted water for 4-5 minutes until tender, then drain and refresh under cold water.

Bring another pan of water to the boil and carefully lower in the duck eggs with a slotted spoon, simmer for 5-6 minutes depending on size, then refresh under cold water for a few minutes.

To serve, peel the duck eggs, cut the asparagus in half or, if you prefer, keep them whole, arrange the asparagus on serving plates, place the egg on top and spoon over the mayonnaise. Sprinkle with the cayenne pepper.

Nigella Lawson’s redder than red cranberry sauce

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 15, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Recipe taken from Nigella Christmas by Nigella Lawson (Chatto & Windus, £25)

1 x 340g pack fresh cranberries
200g caster sugar
45ml cherry brandy
75ml water

Put everything into a pan and let it bubble away until the berries start to pop, stirring every now and again with a wooden spoon. This will take about 10 minutes.

You should bear in mind, though, that the pectin-rich nature of the fruit means it solidifies enormously on cooling, so although it will be cooked when the berries have burst, it will still look runnier than you think cranberry sauce should.

At this stage, give the sauce a final, vicious, whipping stir to help crush the berries into the liquid, and taste – making sure not to burn your mouth – to check whether it needs more sugar; if you find it too sweet, which is unlikely, just spritz in some lemon juice. Transfer to a bowl to cool.

If you cook this sauce way in advance, it will jellify a lot so thrash it through with a fork before serving.

Meatballs with yellow polenta

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 15, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

1kg minced pork
1kg minced veal
75g soft white breadcrumbs
1 dried red chilli, crumbled
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped
small bunch of thyme, leaves only
75g freshly grated Parmesan
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the sauce:

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 red onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 dried red chilli, crumbled
3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
3 fresh bay leaves
1 bunch of sage
200ml full-bodied red wine
2 jars of good quality Italian tomatoes
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Place the meatball ingredients together in a large bowl and mix very well. The easiest and most thorough way of doing this is with your hands. Once the mixture is well combined, roll into 18 generous-sized balls and set aside while you make the sauce.

Place a large, heavy-based pan on top of the stove, turn the heat to medium and add the olive oil. Once the oil is warm, add the onion, chilli and garlic, turn the heat down slightly and cook for 10 minutes; the onion should be soft and translucent.

Add the bay leaves, sage and a good pinch of salt and cook for a further five minutes, then add the wine and return the heat to medium.

Allow the wine to bubble for a minute, then add the tomatoes, place a lid on the pan and cook for half an hour, by which time the sauce should have reduced a little to be rich and dark.

Season with a good pinch of salt and a little black pepper and add the meatballs. Return the lid and cook for 20 minutes, then serve.

Autumn squash soup with walnut pesto

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 15, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

There is an abundance of squashes and pumpkins on the market at the moment; the deep orange-fleshed varieties offer the best flavour and colour.

a good knob of butter
1 small leek, roughly chopped and washed
1 small onion, peeled and roughly chopped
1kg ripe, orange-fleshed squash or pumpkin, peeled, seeded and roughly chopped
1.5 litres vegetable stock
salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the pesto:

40g good-quality walnuts, lightly toasted
50g fresh basil leaves and any soft stalks
1 clove of garlic, peeled and crushed
a good pinch of sea salt
4 tbsp freshly grated Parmesan
2 tbsp freshly grated mature Pecorino (or use 6 tbsp Parmesan)
100-120ml extra virgin olive oil (preferably a sweeter variety)

To make the the pesto, put the walnuts, basil, garlic and salt in a liquidiser and coarsely blend. Add the cheese and blend again briefly, then transfer to a bowl.

Gently cook the leek and onion in the butter in a thick-bottomed saucepan until soft. Add the squash and vegetable stock, bring to the boil, season with salt and pepper then simmer for 20 minutes.

Blend in a liquidiser until smooth, then strain through a fine-meshed sieve. Re-heat the soup and adjust the consistency with a little vegetable stock or water if necessary and re-season with salt and pepper. Serve with a spoonful of the pesto on top.

Ribs

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 7, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

3kg pork spare ribs

For the marinade:

300ml tomato ketchup
300ml soy sauce
125g clear honey
5cm piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated
4 garlic cloves, crushed
5 tbsp dry sherry
1 tspn ground star anise
1 tbsp chopped rosemary

Do not buy ready marinated foods – they are pretty average and you can do better yourself without too much time or hassle. You can buy sheets of spare ribs, which can be left whole or cut into manageable lengths for cooking, then cut into individual ribs once they have been barbecued. Serve with potato skins and chargrilled corn on the cob, with napkins and finger bowls on hand for those sticky fingers.

Put all the marinade ingredients in a large shallow dish, then mix thoroughly to combine. Add the ribs and turn them in the mixture to coat evenly. Cover and leave to marinate in a cool place for 2-4 hours, or in the fridge for up to 24 hours.

Put the ribs in a large, deep saucepan – you may have to split the sheet in half to fit. Pour over the tomato ketchup mixture and add just enough water to cover the ribs completely. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over a medium heat for about 1 hour until completely tender. Remove the ribs from the heat and transfer to a large, shallow, non-metallic dish. Allow the ribs to cool in the marinade, then chill until ready to put on the barbecue. They can be kept in the fridge for up to 24 hours.

When ready to use the ribs, carefully scoop off the fat from the top of the mixture and discard, then allow the mixture to come back to room temperature. Drain off all the marinade and pour some into a large, wide saucepan. Cook it over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until reduced to a sticky coating consistency.

Set the ribs on the barbecue grill over medium-high heat and cook for 8-10 minutes each side, occasionally basting or painting the ribs with the reduced marinade until lightly charred.

Cut into single ribs to serve.

Remember, marinade is a noun, marinate is a verb.

Nigella Lawson’s redcurrant and mint lamb cutlets

Posted in Food with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2010 by Robin Gosnall

Half Hour Meals

This is a recipe from Nigella Lawson’s new book Kitchen: Recipes from the Heart of the Home, packed with ideas for the sort of food that makes life easier at the end of a long day in the time-strapped week, along with dozens of comforting recipes that help you unwind with family or friends. There are step-by-step pictures, and kitchen snapshots, some of them taken by Nigella Lawson in the course of writing the book.

My mother often used to make a kind of faux Cumberland sauce to go with lamb chops. She’d dollop some redcurrant jelly into a bowl, grate in a little orange zest and squeeze in a little juice, then stir in some freshly chopped mint, or dried mint if there were no fresh. Somehow, it worked, and this is simply a development along the same lines. Impatience, I have learnt, can be an inspirational prompt to the cook. Laziness is accounted for, greed rewarded: that’s a result.

1 x 15ml tablespoon garlic oil
6 lamb cutlets
juice 1 clementine/satsuma (approx 75ml)
1 x 15ml tablespoon redcurrant jelly
dash Worcestershire sauce
dash red wine vinegar or sherry vinegar
salt and pepper, to taste
small bunch or packet fresh mint, finely chopped

Heat the oil in a frying pan and cook the lamb for about 2-4 minutes a side, depending on how you like them and on the thickness of the cutlets. Remove the cutlets to a large piece of foil and make a baggy package, though sealing it tightly, and keep on a warm plate. Turn the heat down to low, then whisk in the clementine or satsuma juice, redcurrant jelly, Worcestershire sauce, vinegar, salt and pepper. Take the pan off the heat. Unwrap the foil parcel, divide the cutlets between 2 warmed plates, and pour into the pan any juices that have collected under the waiting cutlets. Whisk well, then pour this over the cutlets. Sprinkle with about 2 tablespoons chopped mint, and offer more on the table to eat with the supper.

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